Permutation and Combination

Permutations and Combinations-

‘Permutations and Combinations’ is the next post of my series Topics in IB Mathematics.It is very useful and interesting as a topic. It’s also very useful in solving problems of Probability. To understand Permutations and Combinations, we first need to understand Factorial.

Definition of Factorial-  If we multiply n consecutive natural numbers together, then the product is called factorial of n. Its shown by n! or by

for example :       n! = n(n - 1)(n - 2)(n - 3)..........3.2.1

Some Properties of Factorials-
(i) Factorials can only be calculated for positive integers at this level. We use gamma functions to define non-integer factorial that’s not required at this level
(ii) Factorial of a number can be written as a product of that number with the factorial of its predecessor    n! = n[(n - 1)(n - 2)(n - 3)..........3.2.1]

 = n(n - 1)!

(iii)  0! = 1  you can watch this video for the explanation.

Read more

Applications of Integration

Applications of Integration

In my previous posts, we discussed Definite and Indefinite Integrations. Now we shall learn about Applications of Derivatives. Initially, we shall discuss “Area Under Curves”.

Area Under Curve-: If we want to calculate the area between the curves y=f(x) and y=g(x) then there are actually two cases-

First Case when   f(x) \ge g(x)Below is the figure showing this case

Area_G1

here area under these  two curves       

 

The second Case When  f(x) \le g(x)Below figure shows this case

Area_G2

Read more

Definite Integration-Topics in IB Mathematics

Definite Integration

In the previous post, we discussed indefinite integration. Now we shall discuss definite integration

► Definite Integration- We already know that   \int {f\left( x \right){\rm{ }}dx = g\left( x \right) + c}    \leftarrow  this c here is an integral constant. we are not sure about its value. This c is the reason we call this process indefinite integration. But suppose we do our integration between certain limits like:-

\int\limits_a^b {f(x)dx = \left[ {g(x) + c} \right]} _a^b   here a \to  lower limit while b \to  higher limit

\int\limits_a^b {f(x)dx = \left[ {g(b) + c} \right]} - \left[ {g(a) + c} \right]

=g(b)-g(a)

You can clearly see that this function is independent of ‘c’. Means we can be sure about its value so this type of integration is called  Definite Integration.

►Definite Integration of a function f(x) is possible in [a,b] if f(x) is continuous in the given interval

►If f(x), the integrand, is not continuous for a given value of x then it doesn’t mean that g(x), the integral, is also discontinuous for that value of x.

► Definite integration of a function between given limits like     \int\limits_a^b {f\left( x \right)dx} \Rightarrow         Algebraic sum of areas bounded by the given curve f(x) and given lines x=a and x=b. That’s why the answer for definite integration problems is a single number.

► If \int\limits_a^b {f\left( x \right)dx} = 0 that shows a few things:-

(i) The lines between which area is bounded are co-incident(a=b)

(ii) Area covered above the x-axis=Area covered below the x-axis that means positive part of area and negative part of area is equal

(iii) there must be at least one solution/root to f(x) between x=a and x=b(this is something we study in ROLE’S THEOREM in detail)

► If given function f(x) is not continuous at x=c then we should write

\int\limits_a^b {f\left( x \right)dx} = \int\limits_a^{{c^ - }} {f(x)dx} + \int\limits_{{c^ + }}^a {f(x)dx}

► If given function f(x) > or <0 in any given interval (a,b) then  \int\limits_a^b {f\left( x \right)dx} \Rightarrow  >0 or <0 in given interval (a,b)

► If given function f(x)  \ge  g(x) in the given interval (a,b) then    \int\limits_a^b {f(x)dx \ge } \int\limits_a^b {g(x) \ge } dx 

in the given interval

► If we integrate the given function f(x) in the given interval (a,b) then

\int\limits_a^b {f(x)dx \le } \left| {\int\limits_a^b {g(x) \ge } dx} \right| \le \int\limits_a^b {\left| {f(x)} \right|dx}

<img src="definite integration.jpg" alt="definite integration">

Some More Properties of Definite Integration:- Read more

Indefinite Integration-Topics in IB Mathematics

Indefinite Integration

After a long series on differentiation and ‘Application of derivatives‘, we shall now discuss Indefinite Integration. It consists of two different words indefinite and integration.
First of all, we shall learn about Integration.

 Integration is the reverse process of differentiation so we can also call it as antiderivative. There is one more name for it, that is Primitive.
If f & g are functions of x such that g'(x) = f(x) then the function g is called a Primitive Or Antiderivative Or Integral of  f(x) w.r.t. x and is written symbolically as:-

\int {f\left( x \right){\rm{ }}dx = g\left( x \right) + c}

If    \frac{d}{{dx}}\left\{ {f(x) + c} \right\} = f'(x)

then  \int {f'\left( x \right){\rm{ }}dx = f\left( x \right) + c}      here c is just an arbitrary constant. Value of c is not definite that’s why we call it Indefinite Integration.

Techniques  Of  Integration-: There are a few important techniques used to solve problems based on integration

(i) Substitution or  Change of Independent Variable- If the derivative of a function is given in the question, then we should use the method of substitution to integrate that question. Read more

Increasing and Decreasing Functions

Increasing and decreasing functions

This is my third post in the series of “Applications of derivatives”. The previous two were based on “Tangent and Normal” and “Maxima and Minima”.In this post, we shall learn about increasing and decreasing functions. That is one more application of derivatives.

Increasing and Decreasing Functions- We shall first learn about increasing functions

Increasing Function-

(a) Strictly increasing function- A function f (x) is said to be a strictly increasing function on (a, b) if x1< x2  \Rightarrow f(x1) < f (x2) for all xl, x2 \in (a, b).Thus, f(x) is strictly increasing on (a, b) if the values of f(x) increase with the increase in the values of x.Refer to the graph in below-given figure  \Downarrow <img src="increasing decreasing function.jpg" alt="increasing decreasing function">

Read more